Charnell Lucich

We can’t solve our problems with the same level of thinking that created them.

Posted on: October 25, 2013

Albert Einstein. A brilliant and famous man who really nailed it with that quote (see subject).

I have my morning routines as most of us do and one of them is reading LinkedIn. This morning I came across an article that really stood out to me and caused me to think (again) about a topic I’ve been researching for the last 6 – 7 months or so.

In the early part of this past summer, Gallup released its “State of the American Workforce” report – a massive research undertaking that identified how connected and contented people feel in their jobs.  It’s from this study, 150,000 personal interviews over the course of a year, that researchers determined only 30% of us are fully engaged at work.

The news got even worse a few days ago when Gallup announced the results of its global workplace study.  Across 142 countries, they discovered only 13% of the working population does much more than show up on time and meet the minimum expectations for their jobs.

Take a look at these worldwide results:

  • 13% Engaged: Employees feel a strong connection to the success of their organization – almost as owners – and invest significant discretionary time and effort. 
  • 63% Not Engaged: People feel less connected to their work and are disinclined to display initiative.
  • 24% Actively Disengaged: Workers who are unhappy, unproductive – and liable to spread their negativity to co-workers.
    • This means 87% of the world’s working population is not meaningfully engaged in, or otherwise enthusiastic about their jobs.
      • Worldwide, actively disengaged employees outnumber engaged employees by nearly 2:1.
       
      I believe it. I see it every day. Everywhere. Whether it’s at work, at my local stores that I frequently visit, …. everywhere.
       

      So, what’s the single greatest reason the world’s workforce is disengaged?

      Too Few People In Leadership Roles Are Well-Suited For The Task

      Amen.
       
      So what’s the secret to great leadership today? See the subject of this post. Albert Einsteins logic applies here.
       
      The reason so many people are distressed in their jobs today is because our traditional ways of managing them no longer work.  To solve our engagement problem, therefore, we must collectively adopt the practices that do work and select into management only the people who have the desire and inclination to implement them.
       
      Research shows that employees have dreams and aspirations of work that far transcend a paycheck.  They want to grow, do meaningful work, and be made to feel valued for all they contribute.  Not surprisingly, leaders who go out of their way to help people attain these goals end up having a profoundly positive effect on how they feel about their work. – See more at: http://markccrowley.com/the-single-greatest-reason-the-worlds-workforce-is-disengaged/#sthash.LKRtBNmY.dpuf
       
      How many of you experience this today (whether you see it or have 1st hand experience)? Do you see leadership (whether it’s a manager, a director, or a higher position) caring more about helping others grow, develop, and succeed or is the focus more exclusively on their own ambitions, recognition, and

      progress?
       
      Check out “The Single Greatest Reason The World’s Workforce is Disengaged” over at Mark Crowley’s site and read the rest of the story – http://markccrowley.com/the-single-greatest-reason-the-worlds-workforce-is-disengaged/
       
       
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